How to Schedule Tasks With Cron In Bash?

7 minutes read

To schedule tasks with cron in Bash, you can use the following steps:

  1. Open the crontab file using the command crontab -e. This will open the file in the default editor.
  2. Each line in the crontab file represents a task you want to schedule. Each task follows a specific syntax: Minute (0-59) Hour (0-23) Day of the month (1-31) Month (1-12) Day of the week (0-7, where both 0 and 7 represent Sunday) Command to be executed
  3. Choose the values for each field based on your desired schedule. You can use asterisks (*) to represent any value. For example, if you want a task to run every hour, you can use * * * * *.
  4. Add a new line to the crontab file with the desired schedule and the command to be executed. For example: To run a script located at /path/to/script.sh every day at 9:00 AM, the line would be: 0 9 * * * /path/to/script.sh To execute a command every 15 minutes, the line would be: */15 * * * * command_here
  5. Save the changes and exit the editor.


The cron scheduler will then execute the specified task based on the defined schedule. It is important to note that any output generated by the task will be sent via email to the owner of the crontab file, unless redirected to a file or nullified.


Additional points to consider:

  • You can list all existing cron jobs for the current user by running crontab -l.
  • To remove all cron jobs for the current user, run crontab -r.
  • The system-wide cron configuration is located in /etc/crontab, but it is generally recommended to use the user-specific crontab instead to avoid conflicts and simplify management.

Best Linux Books to Read in 2024

1
Linux Bible

Rating is 5 out of 5

Linux Bible

2
Practical Linux Forensics: A Guide for Digital Investigators

Rating is 4.9 out of 5

Practical Linux Forensics: A Guide for Digital Investigators

3
The Linux Command Line, 2nd Edition: A Complete Introduction

Rating is 4.8 out of 5

The Linux Command Line, 2nd Edition: A Complete Introduction

4
How Linux Works, 3rd Edition: What Every Superuser Should Know

Rating is 4.7 out of 5

How Linux Works, 3rd Edition: What Every Superuser Should Know

5
CompTIA Linux+ Certification All-in-One Exam Guide, Second Edition (Exam XK0-005)

Rating is 4.6 out of 5

CompTIA Linux+ Certification All-in-One Exam Guide, Second Edition (Exam XK0-005)

6
CompTIA Linux+ Study Guide: Exam XK0-005 (Sybex Study Guide)

Rating is 4.5 out of 5

CompTIA Linux+ Study Guide: Exam XK0-005 (Sybex Study Guide)


What is the command to enable/disable a cron job in Bash?

To enable or disable a cron job in Bash, you can use the "crontab" command with the "-e" option to edit the crontab file. Then, you can comment out or remove the corresponding line to disable a cron job, or uncomment it to enable a cron job. After making the necessary changes, you need to save and exit the file for the changes to take effect.


To open the crontab file for editing, use the command:

1
crontab -e


After editing the crontab file, save and exit to enable or disable the cron job accordingly.


What is the command to list all users' cron jobs in Bash?

To list all users' cron jobs in Bash, you can use the following command:

1
sudo crontab -l -u username


Replace "username" with the actual username for which you want to list the cron jobs. Running this command with "sudo" ensures that you have the required permissions to view other users' cron jobs.


How to schedule a task to run on specific days of the month using cron in Bash?

To schedule a task to run on specific days of the month using cron in Bash, you can use the following syntax in your cron file:

1
* * * * * command-to-be-executed


The first five fields represent minutes, hours, days of the month, months, and days of the week. To schedule a task on specific days of the month, you need to specify the desired days in the "days of the month" field.


Here are some examples to schedule a task on specific days:

  1. To run the task on the 1st and 15th of every month:
1
* * 1,15 * * command-to-be-executed


  1. To run the task on the 1st of January, April, and October:
1
* * 1 1,4,10 * command-to-be-executed


  1. To run the task on every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday:
1
* * * * 1,3,5 command-to-be-executed


Make sure to replace command-to-be-executed with the actual command or script you want to schedule.

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Telegram Whatsapp Pocket

Related Posts:

Cron is a time-based job scheduler in Linux operating systems that allows you to automate the execution of tasks at specific intervals. Here's how you can schedule cron jobs in Linux:Open a terminal or SSH into your Linux server. Type crontab -e to edit th...
To write a basic Bash script, follow these steps:Open a text editor and create a new file with a .sh extension (e.g., script.sh).Start the script with a shebang, which tells the system to interpret the commands using Bash. Use "#!/bin/bash" at the begi...
To check if enable-bracketed-paste is enabled or disabled in Bash, you can use the following steps:Open the terminal or command prompt on your system.Type bash and hit Enter to launch the Bash shell.Enter bind -v | grep enable-bracketed-paste and press Enter.I...
To redirect the output of a bash script to another file, you can use the ">" symbol followed by the filename. Here's how to do it:Open the terminal and navigate to the directory where your bash script is located. Use the following syntax to redi...
To run a bash script during a Docker run, you can follow these steps:Start by creating a Dockerfile. This file will define the build process for your Docker image. You can use a text editor to create this file. In the Dockerfile, specify the base image you wan...
In Bash scripting, command-line arguments allow you to provide input and parameters to a script during execution. Here's an overview of how to handle command-line arguments in a Bash script:To access the command-line arguments, you can refer to them using ...